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The BISF House General Chat Archive.

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Posted : 23 July 2017 5:56 PM
Ed (Senior Member)
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I like the grey colour too. That cladding looks fairly new and not the original to me (not the same profile as the one we have). Still deciding on a colour for ours for when the weather improves.

Ed

 
Posted : 23 July 2017 5:56 PM
Admin
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George, here is a photo of a similar collar that is located inside the kitchen, near to the external wall.
Collar

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Posted : 23 July 2017 5:56 PM
Admin
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Hi AW, sorry I missed your reply, have been on vacation for several weeks.
I personally wouldn't cut into the steel profile as it could cause many more problems. Perhaps you could identify the roof line and pack out the recesses with something suitable like plastic box profile pipe if you can find a suitable with and secure it with a high performance, waterproof adhesive. What you need to achieve a a waterproof flat surface to join to. I have seen other methods used, including using a 3" plastic trim panel attached to the metal and the recesses behind again packed with sealant such as Stick Like S**T. As long as a lasting waterproof seal is achieved you should be good to go.
P.S I like the grey colour :0)

 
Posted : 23 July 2017 5:56 PM
Admin
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Hello George
Sorry to hear that you are having problems with your internal drain.
You say that the cast iron stench pipe has been removed from the inside of the house and a new pipe has been fitted to the outside.
Have your builders fitted a new plastic pipe (Best Option) or replaced it with a metal pipe?
Your original stench pipe fitted snugly into the collar of a Clay drainage pipe that usually runs outside the house to the rear of the property. When removing the old pipe, great care must be taken not to crack the clay pipe in the floor as it can easily crack, particularly if the old pipe was removed by force, i.e using / lump hammers to crack the old pipe rather than using the correct cutting tool.
The fact that you now have water leaking out of the external wall could be due to a cracked clay sewer pipe or it could also be due to a poor connection / seal where the new pipe joins the clay collar.
It may be that the new pipe simply needs to be re-sealed but if the pipe is broken, the builders may need to replace the underground portion of pipe.
You may find that your home insurance may cover you for accidental damage to this pipe.
Failing that, they will need to start digging outside the wall near to the leak and install a new pipe and connect it to the existing sewer. It is not a particularly difficult job but it does entail digging down and where necessary removing any concrete surface that may be present.
Before you go down that route, do you have any water leaking inside the Kitchen?
I ask because in most cases the clay collar is located at floor level. If this was cracked the water would be leaking at foundation level.
Can you provide us with photographs of both inside the house, where the new pipe enters the house, and also of the leak outside?
Regards
Marc

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Posted : 23 July 2017 5:56 PM
george
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Thank you Ed , I had hired a drainage company , the removed the original steel drainage pipe from inside the building an re-feet a new one outside the building . The problem was some where under the kitchen floor level , the contractor recommend that the link between metal sewer(inside the house ) and ceramic sewer was (under ground) was cracked , causing water leaking true external kitchen wall at concrete basement level .

 
Posted : 23 July 2017 5:56 PM
george
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Hi George and welcome! Where abouts is the drainage problem, within the house itself or in the sewer under the house/outside? Within the house, the drainage is standard for BISF houses but if it's outside it will probably depend on the local topography rather than the house type.Ed

 
Posted : 23 July 2017 5:56 PM
Ed (Senior Member)
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Hi George and welcome! Where abouts is the drainage problem, within the house itself or in the sewer under the house/outside? Within the house, the drainage is standard for BISF houses but if it's outside it will probably depend on the local topography rather than the house type.

Ed

 
Posted : 23 July 2017 5:56 PM
george
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Hi ,
I am George , I am new here ,
I have a BISF house and I have some drainage problem ?
Does anyone have a drainage plan for this houses for Coventry, Canley ?
Thank you

 
Posted : 23 July 2017 5:56 PM
Ed (Senior Member)
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Hi, I have seen BISF houses with pitched-roofed extensions and conservatories with flashing onto the steel cladding so it can be done, but it looks bodged and prone to leaking. If I was going to do it, I would have a flat roof covered in EPDM with the EPDM flashed directly under the lip of the steel cladding, provided it would give enough height. That would be much more waterproof and look better and EPDM should last decades.

About the flue, what is it made of? Most BISF houses have a chimney breast faced in plasterboard supported by wooden battens on a steel frame. Inside there is a cast-iron pipe for the flue (as in Doug's post on removing it). This is against the wall between the dining room and living room. Other BISF houses can have a masonry chimney breast against the party wall, these mostly seem to be found in Scotland.

Ed

 
Posted : 23 July 2017 5:56 PM
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